Home Projects Services Yacht Sales Stockroom History Yawls Contact

The Concordian

Issue #38, Fall 2004

 

Concordia Owners Speak Out

Earlier a survey was mailed to the first 1/4 of the fleet and owners of Concordias #1-25 were asked the following questions:

  1. How long have you owned your Concordia?
  2. Vessel name and hailing port:
  3. What drew you to your Concordia?
  4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications?
  5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails?
  6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?
  7. Is there anything you would do different?

See the answers in the Survey Results section.

Phalarope #13

Tom & Ann Ashton

We are having a wonderful summer sailing in Maine and making up for last year's disastrous Summer when Tom was diagnosed with Leukemia. He spent some twelve weeks in the hospital undergoing treatment and I am happy to say that he is in remission and looks great so hopefully we can keep him healthy.

We arrived in Maine a few days before Memorial Day and spent the month sailing in and about Penobscot Bay with overnights here and there. On July 22nd Tom, I and our son, Tom, Jr., left Castine, ME for R.I. and Mass. We did not get to R.I. as our head broke down in Boothbay Harbor. Try and find a plumber over the weekend. Fortunately our son has a good friend who lives in Rockland who happened to be home from his shipping job (he was scheduled to leave the next day). His friend picked up a new head and brought it to us so now our son has become a master plumber at sea. We continued, motoring, as there was virtually no wind that week-got through the Cape Cod Canal on the 27th; anchored overnight at Onset and then proceeded to Hadleys Harbor for one night. We had not been there for many years and had heard how crowded it had become but fortunately for us it was midweek and the weather not so good so we easily picked up a mooring. On Thursday we went to Marion and picked up one of Taylor Academy's moorings, our son having graduated from there in 1989.

The next day I left the boat and three of Tom's strapping friends arrived for the sail of a lifetime back to Castine. There was a race sponsored by the Beverley Yacht Club, Sparkman & Stephens and the Castine Yacht Club which was followed by a symposium held at the Maine Maritime Academy and celebrating Sparkman & Stephens 75th anniversary. We had been told that there would be several Concordias in that race but we turned out to be the only one. Too bad because it was one hell of a race. Eleven boats participated in it including one 12 meter and Geraldo Rivera's Voyager. They had 25-30 knot winds and our boat blew out its spinnaker Saturday evening, as well as several other minor mishaps. Whereas we took us a week to putt down to Marion, everyone was back in 30 hours.

The next Thursday we raced from Castine to Camden, then Camden to Wooden Boat on Friday followed by the Eggemoggin Reach Race on Saturday. We had lots of Concordias there ELEVEN!! of them- the following participated in the race-Coriolis, Katrina, Allure, Starlight, Portunus, Thistledown, Phalarope, Java, Streamer, Carol Lyn and Raka!!! Are we missing something by not planning the Concordia reunion cruise around this event? A Cape to Castine race is really fun and a good "feeder" to the ERR race. Might be an idea to do some cruising for a few days after this race. We would be happy to host a party at our house which is directly across from the yacht club in Castine. The rest of September and October will be overnighting here and there. It has been a great summer and we feel truly blessed that Tom has made up for what he missed last summer. We keep Phalarope moored off the Castine Yacht Club in the summers and she lives at Bob Vaughan's Seal Cove Boat Yard in the winter.

We are having a wonderful summer sailing in Maine and making up for last year's disastrous Summer when Tom was diagnosed with Leukemia. He spent some twelve weeks in the hospital undergoing treatment and I am happy to say that he is in remission and looks great so hopefully we can keep him healthy.

We arrived in Maine a few days before Memorial Day and spent the month sailing in and about Penobscot Bay with overnights here and there. On July 22nd Tom, I and our son, Tom, Jr., left Castine, ME for R.I. and Mass. We did not get to R.I. as our head broke down in Boothbay Harbor. Try and find a plumber over the weekend. Fortunately our son has a good friend who lives in Rockland who happened to be home from his shipping job (he was scheduled to leave the next day). His friend picked up a new head and brought it to us so now our son has become a master plumber at sea. We continued, motoring, as there was virtually no wind that week-got through the Cape Cod Canal on the 27th; anchored overnight at Onset and then proceeded to Hadleys Harbor for one night. We had not been there for many years and had heard how crowded it had become but fortunately for us it was midweek and the weather not so good so we easily picked up a mooring. On Thursday we went to Marion and picked up one of Taylor Academy's moorings, our son having graduated from there in 1989.

The next day I left the boat and three of Tom's strapping friends arrived for the sail of a lifetime back to Castine. There was a race sponsored by the Beverley Yacht Club, Sparkman & Stephens and the Castine Yacht Club which was followed by a symposium held at the Maine Maritime Academy and celebrating Sparkman & Stephens 75th anniversary. We had been told that there would be several Concordias in that race but we turned out to be the only one. Too bad because it was one hell of a race. Eleven boats participated in it including one 12 meter and Geraldo Rivera's Voyager. They had 25-30 knot winds and our boat blew out its spinnaker Saturday evening, as well as several other minor mishaps. Whereas we took us a week to putt down to Marion, everyone was back in 30 hours.

The next Thursday we raced from Castine to Camden, then Camden to Wooden Boat on Friday followed by the Eggemoggin Reach Race on Saturday. We had lots of Concordias there ELEVEN!! of them- the following participated in the race-Coriolis, Katrina, Allure, Starlight, Portunus, Thistledown, Phalarope, Java, Streamer, Carol Lyn and Raka!!! Are we missing something by not planning the Concordia reunion cruise around this event? A Cape to Castine race is really fun and a good "feeder" to the ERR race. Might be an idea to do some cruising for a few days after this race. We would be happy to host a party at our house which is directly across from the yacht club in Castine. The rest of September and October will be overnighting here and there. It has been a great summer and we feel truly blessed that Tom has made up for what he missed last summer. We keep Phalarope moored off the Castine Yacht Club in the summers and she lives at Bob Vaughan's Seal Cove Boat Yard in the winter.

Snowy Owl #91

Richard S. Taylor

I purchased #91 ex Shimaera now Snowy Owl in December of 2003 after loosing my Wianno Senior, Owl, in the boatyard fire at Crosbys. I had always admired these boats starting with the 50th anniversary of the class in 1988 at South Dartmouth.

I have returned Snowy Owl to her original 7/8 rig and hank on jib. I have also removed the stern pulpit, boom gallows and dodger. Snowy Owl now has a boom crutch like Java. I believe that in almost every respect she is like the original Concordias and what the designer, Ray Hunt intended.

Snowy Owl still has the Grey Marine engine. I put a rebuilt one in, and the interior is like she left Abeking & Rasmussen. I am delighted with the boat and look forward to many years of sailing. This summer includes a trip to Maine.

On a final note, all work was performed by Dodson Boat Yard to the highest standard. Snowy Owl has a new home port in Osterville, Massachusetts.

Malay #2

Clark Poston, Program Director, I.Y.R.S.

I am short on time or something to say about "Maylay." She is in our storage lot awaiting an Advanced Restoration Fellowship to be developed to begin working on her restoration. She is in good company: the famous Rhodes, "Carina," a NY32, a Herreshoff BB30, and an early Clinton Crane design. We look forward to developing that program and remain dedicated to the preservation and restorations of all of our fleet. Perhaps as we near some move toward her we can begin a series on her beginning with her history.

Coriolis #82

Douglas & Susan Adkins

Coriolis (No. 82) has spent the last three summers far from our summer home on Orcas Island, Washington. During 2002 she lay in charred pieces at The Concordia Company awaiting rebuilding after her disastrous fire in January of that year. In July, 2003 she was relaunched after her beautiful rebuild and she sailed Buzzard's Bay and the Elizabeth Islands, Block Island Sound and to Newport. This third year she took us to Maine to race and cruise. Our objective was to participate in the Castine to Camden race, the Camden Feeder Race and the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta. So off we went, Brodie MacGregor, my childhood pal Peter Phillips and me, through the Cape Cod Canal on the flood and out across a moonlit and flat calm Massachusetts Bay. We powered and powered, finally settling for Boothbay Harbor (instead of Tenants Harbor) to buy fuel and enjoy a night at anchor. Next day in lots of fog we sailed and motored to Castine and a day there tuning was followed by a spectacular dinner hosted by the Castine Yacht Club for the racers. Included in the group was a wonderful collection of S&S designs; their owners along with great designers such as Olin Stephens, David Pedrick, Chuck Paine, Doug Petersen and others. The Castine Yacht Club Juniors served us Lobster on the lawn with great enthusiasm and charm.

Racing to Camden was terrific with good breezes. A magnificent Fife Six Meter named Alana won our class and deserved to do so in such a breeze. The next day's Camden Feeder Race to Brookline was a drifter with tide management being more critical than wind seeking. Most dropped out, but a few clever stalwarts finished a shortened course before motoring to Brookline.

The Eggemoggin Reach Regatta was sailed in light air on a beautiful Maine day. Our class totaled 25 boats and included 13 Concordia yawls, a really remarkable sight. Brodie, Peter, Susan and our daughter Blakeley were aboard along with Tom Jackson of WoodenBoat and Coriolis sailed and finished very well so we were delighted at being able to come East and keep up.

The racing was followed with a week of cruising around Mt. Desert and as far afield as Sorrento, Coriolis' home when owned by Gifford Ewing in the 60's and 70's. We were warmly greeted by some of his relatives and it was wonderful to share her history.

We left the boat at Rockport Marine through arrangements made by Brodie with Taylor Allen, the yard's very helpful owner. We had experienced a persistent leak forward and I worried about it, maybe more than I should have. Rockport hauled her and replaced a stopwater in the stem which solved the problem - they did a terrific job of it by removing one plank end and scarfing in a replacement.

In mid-September I met Brodie at Logan Airport where we were joined by Jeff Makolm, owner of Arapaho (No. 85). We flew to Rockland, ME and prepared for our trip back to Padanaram with a lovely dinner in Camden. It started to rain that night and it didn't stop for a very long time . . . the results of Hurricane Ivan we later learned. The next morning at 0930 we left Rockland and 31 hours later we landed at the Concordia Company. In between we had lots of rain, lots of wind and lots of excitement. As we headed southwest we found a nor'easter building. Around mid-day we were startled by a large marine mammal below us and next to our starboard quarter. It seemed odd but I have seen many Orca Whales (killers) in the Northwest and this looked like a juvenile male or a female. Quite exciting for us all.

The afternoon breeze built to 15 to 20 knots and the seas grew to 6 to 8 feet. Suddenly Jeff called out that he had no steerage, raising his hands skyward to emphasize the point. Our cable had broken on the wheel steering and we gybed out of control, the preventer bending the boom as we lay over. Quick action kept the boom from breaking. We thrashed around under our mizzen lying to the waves. When Coriolis was rebuilt, I asked that a tillerhead be installed to convert to tiller steering in emergencies. This certainly filled that bill. Brodie and I struggled to get the tiller on the fitting. Our helm was very heavy, but we steered through the afternoon and night with winds increasing to 25-30 knots and gusts to 40 knots. I find it hard to measure sea heights but Brodie said they were as big as in the 1972 Bermuda Race, so 15 feet, maybe 20. Pretty sporty for this sailor but you take away some important lessons. First, always bring along a Scot who has thousands of miles of blue water under him and knows as much about your boat as anyone in the world. Secondly, always bring a cool headed, cheerful and optimistic international economist who happens to own the sistership to your boat. Thirdly, take a Concordia. They get bigger at sea and they always take care of you. Finally, even the most pedestrian ham and cheese sandwich without mayo (prepared by a Scot, no less) tastes great after long hours in big seas. We had a very memorable delivery. So, Coriolis is being varnished at Concordia. We are trying to arrange trucking and are anxious to bring her home after our wonderful East Coast adventure.

Concordia Company

South Dartmouth, MA

Although glued to the Weather Channel and our computers on many occasions we have been blessed this fall by having no significant wind storms here in Buzzards Bay.

We are fully into decommissioning season, and we have gotten a great head start on winter work for Concordia boats as well as others - remaining fully staffed in traditionally slow September.

At this point we have fifteen Concordia boats scheduled for storage and winter service, with significant carpentry projects on six or seven. Some highlights are as follows:

KESTREL (Concordia 31) - Floors, keel bolts, frames and planks. (See photos)

NIAM (Concordia #24) - Keel timbers, floors, frames and planks.

ARAPAHO (Concordia #85) - Repair damage to starboard (bright) topside. Potentially replace several new planks.

LUNA (Concordia #88) - (In bilge) Fuel tanks and potentially floors and frame ends in main cabin.

LOON (Concordia #45) - Sternpost (See photos)

STARDUST (Concordia 31) - Potentially sternpost and deadwood replacement.

CORIOLIS (Concordia #82) - Is scheduled to be shipped home this fall (or possible next spring depending on trucking arrangements). In any event she has to be in Seattle early May 2005 for a birthday party and the Seattle Yacht Club commissioning. In near perfect condition following her restoration, all of us here feel a great attachment to the boat, and her owners and a little piece of each one of us will go home with her to Seattle and West Sound. The final sail for this season involved a delivery from Rockport, ME to Padanaram in mid September. It was a memorable sail in many ways involving strong winds (fortunately from aft), big waves and outstanding shipmates (Owner Douglas Adkins and Arapaho owner Jeff Makholm).

BEAUTY (Concordia #53) - has been donated to the Duxbury Bay Maritime School and is now listed for sale at $100,000 asking price. Anyone interested in this very nice "41" should contact Brodie at the yard.

Aureole #7

David Catlett

Fellow Concordians,
Around 1991 the ex-Verity set her hook in me. I swept the leaves from her uncovered cockpit and set about to make her a sea worthy vessel for my exploration and discovery.

The journey began one morning when I met the boat hauler loaded and idling at the coffee shop in Jamestown R.I. I took the lead car position over the narrow old Jamestown bridge. I could only flash my lights and pray as met an 18 wheeler near the peak span. A bit of smoke as the tires kissed the steel curb. Thanks to the skilled drivers in both rigs, a safe arrival in Wickford.

I built a building covered with shrink wrap, stairs to the deck, and a coal cook stove in the corner. Living in a rented apartment adjacent. I spent a full year disassembling. Ballast removed, Keelson removed, Frames bent inserted thru the bottom by a ship wright, Ken Sheehan, and fastened in place.

I copied the old floor timbers to make new ones, and beefed up those under the mast step. New longer mast step. Completely re fastened the hull; topsides and below the waterline. Stripped all the paint inside and out, same with the varnish.

Alas the ballast keel replaced with my fathers assistance, imagine our relief when the broom handle slipped free thru the aligned hole. We set the hull onto the ballast gooped with roofing tar. New keel bolts, including the lifting ring bolts which I think are crucial to a safe vessel.

With some great assistance I managed to get the bottom caulked, ballast painted with coal tar epoxy, thru hulls installed and a new rudder tube installed and capped. With no rudder, cockpit sole nor any hatches I launched to escape the shed. I spent the next years living on board building a dream. Finally ditched the Gray 4-112 for a Yanmar 4 JH3E.

Now she will be able to go anywhere and claw off any lee shore if need be. Building the interior has been my greatest pleasure. I salvaged some pine beams from Peter Corr in Tiverton, RI Re-sawed them on a band sawmill. Now I have beautiful match booked raised panel bulkheads. Same with the cabin sole.

The cockpit sole is blind fastened thru beams resting on new stringers. Got a awesome new SS fuel tank for under the port seat. Rudder post is keyed and equipped with rudder arm for the below decks autopilot, and the rudder stops that keep the rudder from contacting the new big prop.

Wiring got was a challenge finally met. I've got a 8-D house battery with an dedicated start battery and independent charging system. I am still building the Galley, engine box and companionway ladder. I sail her locally, usually solo. Launched early this year, May 8th. This years improvements are the self tailing winches and the mizzen is up for the first time.

Wickford has fine cruising grounds. I am blessed to have settled here. The Pleasant Street Wharf has made my restoration possible with fair business practices and shore side social support. I suppose that I am proof that one man can maintain a Concordia Yawl, and with key support manage a restoration.

I must mention that I have the best boat dog underfoot every step of the way, Christine. She leads the way from the bow or around the boatyard, I seem to be following her around. Thanks for sharing our Tale, Fair winds! David

Fleetwood #20

Kersten Prophet, Kiel Germany

Here some news about Fleetwood and the owner family:
Fleetwood received a new mast this May. It is that app. 2.75 feet longer as the tophead 39 mast. That means it is now the original length. Nevertheless I left the fore sail as it is on the tophead rig. Therefore no jumper is necessary. The back stays have to be used only under strong conditions....not on Sunday afternoon.

The main sail is new and much larger as the old one and that is a really great experience. Birte and I are still waiting for our second child. A girl is scheduled and she is now 4 days over the time. I will keep you up informed.

Best to you
Kersten

Fleetwood

Fleetwood went into the water early in April, got the new mast in May and had her first experience with the new mast and mainsail at the end of May. I am very satisfied with the result. More speed at low wind force, less heeling and less force on the tiller. More speed at higher wind force as well, caused by a better profile of the new sail. The old one was made in 1987 at Fred Bremen Sails in Miami. The new main sail has approximately 40m2 (430sq.ft.), and it is very optimized to the given dimensions from mast and boom. Unfortunately the original mainsheet system without a winch is on its limit with the new sail dimensions. I will look forward what to do with that. May be some of the other owners have some suggestions.

I had a one-week sailing trip at the end of May, alone with the boat. Very pregnant Birte and daughter Lea followed us by car. During the summer there was very seldom good afternoon sailing. Unfortunately the western Baltic had one of the worst summers since the start of the weather statistics! Lots of showers and strong wind days, not what we prefer to go sailing in the afternoon.

And then Birte had our second daughter on July 2nd. Following that major Event, we had some hard weeks caused by some problems with Elisas' back. She has the tendency to bend herself like a "C" when she needs something or doesn't like something. That caused many crying hours during day and night. I am full of respect for what Birte did during this time. (Sleeping less and being nice to the children and me!)

Nevertheless during the first two weeks of September we had a high pressure period (Baltic summer 2004), and we took the chance to stay on the boat for two weeks. Again I sailed Fleetwood alone into the Danish islands. Birte and the two children entered by car. We had then some very good days on the boat, mainly in harbor...staying outside in the sun, having Danish burgers and soft ice cream, thoroughly enjoying the time.

Because of the new addition to the owner's family, Fleetwood did not participate in 2004 the Baltic classical yacht races that she used to be in the other years. Nevertheless, on September 24th we participated the last race of the summer at the yacht club where I am a member, and I'm proud to report that we came in 2nd in a field of 20. It was a perfect Concordia day with a perfect course.

This race against the modern designs was done with a handicap called "Yardstick." That is a special German thing based on experience. There is a annual list of handicaps for all popular sailing boats (app.1750). Concordia is not in the list, but the handicap was chosen by comparison between other popular classic boats. It is not too bad and gives Fleetwood a strong chance against the modern design.

Hauling is scheduled for October 30. Winter projects are varnish and paint work. Possibly a refit of the varnish work in the foreship if the time is there.

All the best
Kersten Prophet

Triad Boatworks

Peter Costa, Mattapoisett, MA

Fall is here and the yard is very busy. This year we are working on:

CAPTIVA-We will be doing overhead painting as well as normal paint and varnish. We will be installing a new autopilot and a new fog horn and hailer. This year we will continue with the replacement of two more keel bolts.

ENVOLEE-This year we will be stripping the overhead in addition to the normal paint and varnish. A new refrigeration system will also be installed.

FEATHER-We are looking forward to having FEATHER with us again. Her work list hasn't been finalized yet. To follow-up on last year's restoration of WILD SWAN-we are pleased to hear that WILD SWAN had some great sailing this summer!

As well as the Concordias mentioned, we are working on MANDARIN, a 50' Cheoy Lee, which will be all reframed and get new teak planking. We are also completing work on a Cherubini 44 at this time, which has received a new teak deck as well as many other upgrades.

Have a good winter.
Pete

Irene #103

Doug Cole

We had a pretty uneventful season on Irene this season. Our summer cruise took us back to Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island. We enjoyed a rare easterly on the way out, wing and wing and not a drop of spray on deck. Usually the west bound leg is either foggy and flat or 25+ knots on the nose. We were blessed with the 25+ knots, rather cool, however, on the return trip as well. In September we attended the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival for the first time in several years, sharing a slip with Chris & Kathy Grace on #15 Lotus. A week later we took in the annual CCA fall cruise in the Gulf Islands. As I write the leaves have turned and the fall rains have begun. The winter covers will go on next week.

This may not be exactly Concordian, but it may be of interest to wooden boat people. In the early 1970s I owned an old Q boat, Cotton Blossom II, which was a Johan Anker design built in 1925. She had been raced hard and by the time this young twenty-something came along she was pretty tired with many broken frames. We had lots of fun for seven years and eventually sold her. She languished for 26 years with several subsequent owners until last year when Dennis Conner, who had sailed aboard her as a teenager, came along in search of a classic yacht to restore. Just last week I witnessed her re-christening in San Diego. She is better than new and absolutely stunning. Dennis said his only lament was that she was about $1 million over budget. The story is that we can always hope our Concordias will find someone willing and able to bring them back to a second life when the situation requires. We have seen with Feather, Java and Coriolis that boats with outstanding pedigree, often despite desperate conditions, can be brought back under the care of loving owners and dedicated craftsmen. [email protected]

Cotton Blossom II
(Ed Note: Cotton Blossom web page: www.toandos.com/DCole1.html)

Misc. News & Notes

A reminder to all not to miss the 2005 CYC. Contact James Russell @ 401-848-5777 for more information.

Phyllis Winstral and Jonathan Miller have a mooring in Bucks Harbor for Mistral (#72) and invite any Concordia owners in the area to give them a call and use the mooring if it is empty. (212-477-3747).

Coriolis won the Concordia division in the ERR.

John Kerry's father, Richard Kerry, once owned #47 Sisyphus.

John Heubi of Tempo (#4) continues his restoration and has a Woodmizer portable sawmill and plenty of white oak in his part of Tennessee (Sarah has all new deadwood thanks to a Tennessee oak tree that gave its all).

Tony Harwell of Actaea (#17) (772) 286-5330 - [email protected] has quality US-made bronze screws. Contact him for prices.

Stewart MacDougall sent me a beautifully bound cruising journal, which contains a wonderful recount of their travels and a how-to for cruising California's Santa Cruz Island (and others). The journal is also full of pictures and information on the three Concordias Stewart and Louisa have owned. Any Concordia owner or friend interested in a copy of the publication can contact Stewart at [email protected]

Captiva #100

John & Laurie Bullarad

On October 17th Laurie and I brought Captiva through Force 7 winds from her mooring in New Bedford to Padanaram to be hauled for the season. We managed 27 days aboard this summer with only the IYRS cruise as an extended stay. One highlight was a Buzzards Bay Day (New Bedford to Cuttyhunk to Hadleys and back to New Bedford) for Sam Allis, a writer for the Boston Globe, who wanted to capture in print the Elizabeth Island chain. Another was an evening benefit for the New Bedford Symphony Orchestra. We sailed with Tim Macri and his golden flute and entertained a generous supporter of the NBSO. We'd never sailed with this quality of live classical music before. It was an experience fit for a Concordia! Captiva looked beautiful with her redone topsides and gleaming varnish that the gang at Triad had so lovingly applied. She behaved magnificently save for a Raymarine GPS chartplotter that insists on working two days and then taking several days off. As Laurie and I spend early Friday mornings rowing a whaleboat around New Bedford harbor, we will miss seeing this most beautiful lady gracing the nation's busiest fishing port.

John K. Bullard
President, Sea Education Association
P.O. Box 6
Woods Hole, MA 02543
(800) 552-3633
(508) 540-3954 ext 25
[email protected] - www.sea.edu

Answer to last issue's Mystery Picture

Mystery Concordia

J.P. Sumner sent this picture he took in August of 1954 after Hurricane Carol. His notes say "Sister to Malay" and the picture was taken at Thomas Boatyard- (now known as Dodson Boatyard-Stonington, Connecticut)

Hank Bornhoff t surmised: "There were only 3 41's afloat during Hurricane Carol. Otter, Actaea and Sarah. This boat is a 41 because of the double spreader mast head CCA racing rig. Actaea was a sloop and Sarah was fractional rigged at that time, so this must be #19, Otter!"

Actaea #17

Tony Harwell

Nothing new here. We made it through 2 hurricanes in 3 weeks with no damage to house or boat. Stuart was ground zero for both storms. The Media really hypes it up a lot. They mostly show the trailer parks, although their was damage to a lot of boats and beachfront property. It's a wonder there was no damage to Actaea. As you can see from the photo She's right on the seawall.

I was lucky on both occasions to weasel the boat yard into putting the travel-lift around her. This was the only thing that saved her. Currently I am refastening the port side and replacing more planks. I am still looking for a Wood mast for a 41 footer. If anyone wants to get rid of theirs or trade for an aluminum one, please let me know. Good yard sailing to all! (Actaea #17)

Tony Harwell
(772) 286-5330
[email protected]

546 S.W. Riverview Avenue
Stuart, FL 34994

Hero #22

Rick & Donna Peck

It is just after Columbus Day and we are beginning to wind down another great season on Hero. We are planning to sail her back to Cove Landing in Lyme, CT in late October. She will join several other classics in the basin, covered and set up for wet storage. Last year we had seven and from what I hear this year we may have up to ten classics in the basin.

This summer Hero reached a milestone when she turned 50 on August 23rd. We celebrated her longevity with a group of friends and paid tribute to the great care she received by her two previous owners. We put some colors to the wind marking her milestone and enjoyed some music, cake and sharing stories of our experiences aboard.

Cruising this year was busier than previous years with a 10 day cruise in late July to Fishers Island, Block Island, Newport (during the Wooden Boat Show), and Mystic. Additionally we did a 3 day cruise to Shelter Island over Labor Day weekend and experienced some brisk weather (20-25kts with gusts to 40kts) that kept us in Coecles Harbor a bit longer than planned. We also had several wonderful sails around Long Island Sound getting her up to 8-8.5 kts frequently on broad reaches.

Next year we plan to extend her cruising further and hopefully will include the IYRS Classic Cruise event in July. We would like our 9 year old daughter to come along with us on the IYRS cruise and make it a family event. With many Concordias in attendance this past summer, we would sure appreciate knowing how many had kids aboard (ages) and are you planning to make it next year as well? Please email us and let us know.

Cove Landing did a great job refastening Hero last spring along the rabbit (port & starboard) which really tightened her up very well. Also I replaced the standpipe on the gray marine engine which improved performance by eliminated the pin holes that were producing intermittent exhaust fumes in the cabin. Van Ness Engineering did a quick turn around in making a high quality custom replacement which fits very well.

Well for now, Fall varnishing is well underway both on deck and below. The to-do list for winter/spring projects is starting to be prioritized. Project scope on deck covers building up the varnish on the toe rails, and wooding the cockpit. Below, the normal paint and varnishing will continue, along with finishing up the cabin re-wiring on the port side, removing any old wiring that has no purpose, as well as re-chroming the galley and head sink pumps.

We are looking forward to a great sail back to the Cove at the end of October and enjoying some great fall days as winter approaches.

Fair Winds to all,

Rick & Donna Peck
[email protected]

Hero and Abaco

Live Yankee #64

Warren Nichols

With considerable sadness, I have listed LIVE YANKEE for sale. She is in good shape with the following recent work:

The boat is at Greg Neck Boatyard on the Sasafrass River, Galena, Maryland. Wickes Wescott is the yard master. Phone 410-648-5630 or 410-648-5173.

Warren W. Nichols
[email protected]

Take Five #11

Peter Gallant

The big news with old #11 is she lost her mast while racing in Newport over Labor Day Weekend. The port upper chain plate let go, and the mast snapped around the lower spreaders. No one was hurt, but it was a sad day. Here's something I wish to share with the other owners:

The chain plate failed due to corrosion. Apparently, the metal used was of a lower grade. When restoring the boat years ago, I replaced virtually every piece of metal below deck level, but not the chain plates. Someone once told me that the early German boats used brass, and at some point the quality of the alloy was improved. I've inquired at Concordia, but no definitive answer yet as to when the cut off point occurred. Clearly, it was after 1952. Our boats are getting of the age when these things will begin to appear. I strongly suggest owners investigate their chain plates. The best way is to remove, destruction test and replace one; I recommend an upper plate as these take the most load and stand to do the most damage.

What's most unfortunate is that Acadia, the insurance company, has an exclusion for failure due to corrosion. This is a $50,000 claim, and they're refusing to pay any part of it. Don't let this happen to you. Check your chain plates and check your insurance policy.

Happy Sailing
Peter Gallant

Yankee #37

Jim Cosgrove

This past summer marks our fifth season sailing Yankee in Lake Ontario waters. Already, as I write this, annual coat number one of Captain's varnish is drying on her Sitka spars, all resting on horses beside her in her winter shed. The autumn here has been spectacular, in contrast with the past summer, and we now regret not sailing for another week before layup. The passages we did enjoy sailing Yankee were few and abbreviated over the June-August period. Yankee performed as nicely as ever though, despite erratic winds that always seemed "on the nose." One trip especially stands out: Sailing with a hearty crew and beating our way windward southwest from our Henderson Harbor home some 85 miles to Rochester last July, we were eagerly anticipating a fair run back home under the spinnaker. The lads could hardly wait to break out the 'chute and its rig as we ended our two-day call at the hospitable Rochester YC, but...you guessed it...our excitement turned to dismay when the wind pulled a 180 on us. Oh well, the Westerbeke needed a good workout anyway.

Our new Hood 135 genoa gives the boat more drive and enables her to point higher than ever. Last spring we coated Yankee's white topsides with (high gloss) Interlux Toplac. After a good sanding with 220 grit, we rolled the paint down and tipped it off with a quality, natural bristle brush with breath-taking results. However, imagine my rueful reaction when a boatyard regular declared, "She looks like fiberglass."

Sarah #27

Dave & Margo Geer

Imagine my chagrin when, already greater than two weeks behind in getting the newsletter in the mail, I go to insert the piece on Dave and Sarah I've spent hours working on, and I realize it's saved on Dave's old hard drive - which just happens to be in pieces on the floor. I guess this wasn't the best time to upgrade the network. So I had to choose between waking my computer guy up and having him drive over here at 3 am or rewriting the piece, so here's a quick recap.

Past: As many of you know, Dave passed away on July 18th. What isn't so well known is that Dave was diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer in December of 2001, and in between chemo, radiation, and all of the other horrors, he continued working on the project every day with every ounce of strength he possessed. I was, and will always be, awed by the strength and determination that kept him working on a boat that he knew he would never see in the water. Even at the end when he didn't have the strength to make it down to the boatyard, he would sit on a stool in the garage and cut bungs. When he couldn't make it to the garage, he sat and wrote out lists of materials needed and items that I would need to complete. His final focus centered on leaving me and Sarah in a position where I would be able to finish the project. If my future holds a similar fate, I hope that I can live up to the strong and selfless example he set.

Our coming up for the CYC in 2002 and the ERR in 2003 were all my idea. Dave was happy just staying here spending his time working on boats, but I just couldn't stand the thought of him not getting to sail a Concordia. I will be forever grateful to Marcia Whitney, Dom and Debbie Champa of Praxilla, and Jeff and Mercedes Makholm of Arapaho for the sailing time that he got to enjoy (and well I wasn't having a bad time either...).

Present:

The hurricanes of August and September prevented any forward progress, but Sarah faired just fine, and I just have a little more grey hair from sitting at the house through three major storms wondering how she was doing by herself down at the yard. The only damage was to the car, which I drove through a considerable amount of water going back and forth anxiously checking on the boat.

In October I hired a local man, who, in five short weeks, has replaced the stern knee, crafted an awesome repair to the rudder post (using wood recycled from the old stern knee), replaced the remaining 12 floors, replaced the dead wood, scarfed a large section into the false keel (using wood recycled from the old dead wood), moved the ballast keel back into place, and bolted the whole business back together. There are approximately 24 frames still to be replaced and then planking will commence.

The network of Concordia owners, friends, and others in wooden-boat circles has been tremendous, and just in the last few weeks, a tremendous amount of work has been accomplished. David Catlett (#7 Aureole) came down and helped for a week on various projects, and John Heubi (#4 Tempo) cut and delivered the oak that became Sarah's new deadwood.

Future:

I have rented a 50' x 60' warehouse space, which should be completed about the time the work on Sarah's bottom is finished. My two-fold priority since Dave's death has been to get the project back on track and protect the boat. The project is obviously back on track, and as soon as she can be moved, Sarah will go into the warehouse where work can proceed as time and help is available. The man working on her now has another commitment in January, but word is being circulated every way possible and I am hopeful that I can attract some New England talent down this way.

I do not have the time or ability to update the website, but I have posted project updates in the Building and Repair section of the Wooden Boat Forum. (Go to www.woodenboat.com and click on WB On-Line Forum on the right side of the page, and look for topics started by Concordia..41) There are also several albums posted under my user name "margogeer" (no quotes) at www.imagestation.com and if you have a broadband or DSL connection, there are two slide shows under the same user name at www.photodex.com. The first one is the memorial from Dave's service and the second is Eggemoggin 2003. There are some good Concordia shots in both.

Abaco #102

Jonathan & Dorothy Goldweitz

It is the third weekend in October and we still have Abaco on her mooring in Stamford, but the weather has not always allowed us to take advantage of the best sailing month of the season. Hopefully, we will have one more good sailing day with favorable winds to make the 10-12 hour sail east to the Connecticut River a memorable one.

After a late start in the spring we managed to enjoy some lovely summer weekends afloat. Dorothy's Dad became a frequent and welcome crewmember, and was always an able hand at the helm or with a mechanical repair. We cruised east to Fishers Island in June, had our usual raft-up with Dom Champa and Praxilla, and enjoyed the company of the other Concordias arriving early for the IYRS Classic Cruise. This year's cruise was again full of beautiful boats, great sailing and good fun. We did well on the only race and even won our first-ever hors d'ouevre contest prize.

After leaving the IYRS fleet in Newport, we headed east and left Abaco in Padanaram for 10 days. When we returned, we were met there by Abaco's original owner, Jon's brother Mark, and our nephew David and sailed to Woods Hole where John Bullard (Captiva) and his staff at the Sea Education Association gave us a terrific tour of the SEA campus and their 134-foot brigantine, the SSV Corwith Cramer. We are looking forward to sailing with John aboard SEA's west coast ship, the SSV Robert C. Seamans, in Tahiti in January.

We next sailed to Nantucket, spent a few days biking, fishing for stripers and visiting with family. Our nephew, who first sailed on Abaco when he was five months old, joined us for a couple days of foggy sailing back west so he could meet up with an old college roommate in Block Island. En route back to Stamford, we stopped for a delightful visit with the Peck's, new owners of Hero, in the Thimble Islands. Rick spent many summers in the Thimbles during his youth, and gave us an in-depth tour in his whaler while educating us on local history and recounting tales of youthful summer pursuits.

We arrived back in Stamford, sailing in northerly winds for three straight days since Block Island (unusual for LI Sound in August), and spent the remaining weekends at closer overnight anchorages. We again enjoyed meeting some new owners in the Concordia fleet and seeing old friends once again. As we spend the long hours stripping the sides of the deckhouse in the Cove Landing boat shed this winter, we will look forward to sailing with our Concordia friends again next season.

Survey Results

Java #1

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Just over one year

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

JAVA, Brooklin, ME

Java

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

A Concordia was always the desired vessel from the first time I cruised on one over 40 years ago. Thanks to IYRS the opportunity came up to own a very important Concordia (JAVA), and also to get a boat with a virtually new hull at a reasonable price. Lastly, being based in Maine in the summer at Brooklin we very much wanted to get into the classic boat scene. So it all came together very nicely for us.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

Cruising and day sailing in our home waters. We will probably do the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta again, and participate in the Corinthians Maine Cruise in 2005. We will be adding reefing gear for the mainsail and a hand pump for water in the head.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Other items on the wish list include rebuilding the ice chest, jib furling gear, new primary winches, and raising the galley sink to improve draining.

6.What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Thanks to the IYRS philosophy, JAVA remains very much as she was when owned by Skipper Howland, but we have added radar and a GPS plotter. Our plans include the wish list items, but we very much would like to keep the boat as authentic as possible.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

We received the boat with a new set of sails, and we wished later that we would have had some input on their selection.

Malay #2

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Acquired in October 2001

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

Malay, Newport RI

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Elizabeth Meyer and IYRS are dedicated to preventing the loss of good or important boats. We will restore her.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

MALAY will require as complete a restoration as we found with JAVA.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

DONATIONS toward restoration!!!

Tabakea #6

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Eight and 1/2 years - just completed our 9th summer

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

TABAKEA - Robinhood, ME

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Ever since we began sailing we've loved the beauty of the Concordias' lines, but never dreamed we'd ever own one. Whenever we saw a beautiful yawl, one of us would say, "I bet it's a Concordia." At the Boston Boat Show during the winter/spring of 1996 a broker we had previously worked with (Annie Steedman of Gray & Gray) called us over and said she had a listing that might interest us, and the rest is history! This Concordia was lower priced than the average because it was built with the intention of keeping costs down - such as plywood bulkheads and locker doors rather than knotty pine and larch; only two ports; and lower headroom because the owner (Draytie Cochran) was short - so #6 was not quite "standard" ... but she is gorgeous!

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

We occasionally race in the Eggemoggin Reach Wooden Boat Regatta when it suits our schedule. Every year we spend 2-3 weeks cruising from West Penobscot Bay to the Mt. Desert area (mid-coast ME). This winter she will get new Dynel decks. Most every weekend is spent somewhere between the Sheepscott and Muscongus Bay.

Aureole #7

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Twelve years

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

AUREOLE, Wickford, RI

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Reputation. I had heard how well respected, sea kindly, and well suited to cruising or ocean racing that I referred an acquaintance who shared my desire to own a fine yacht; later I followed my own advice.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

No plans...many dreams.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

SeaFrost refrigeration to be engine driven. Not old enough to need a windless. Would love new self-tailing winches with Ratsy and Laphorn sails from City Island showing up in the consignment shop, my sail inventory feels rich.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Rebuild nearing completion. Taylor Kero oven stove. Planning for electronics soon - Si-tek radar GPS chart plotter and Simrad autopilot.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

Sail more frequently!

TAKE FIVE #11

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Owned from 1984-1997 1/2 owned with Dave Knight since 2002

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

TAKE FIVE - Chatham

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

I had just sold my first boat I built on speculation for $42,000. Looked from Stonington to Oyster Bay for a boat big enough to cross an ocean, but cheap enough to afford. "WINNIE" was beat up and run down but had certain charms. She was a way to cruise through the Caribbean for a winter. Concordias are fun boats to steer. Real boats have tillers. Busses & ships have wheels.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

The boys on the crew would quite like to do the Newport-Bermuda race in '06. From there wouldn't it be fun to do the Riviera classic race circuit in the Med???!!! You'd have to go via Azores and Gibraltar. It's just a pipe dream to keep me going on the endless work!

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Money to pay someone else to work on it. Actually, I think the coolest product is the new Raymarine monitor, which displays all of your electronic data on one screen and mounts to a custom cast bronze swing away bracket so you don't have to look at any of that stuff while sailing.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Changed the cockpit seating with shaped seats and the coaming from 4 degrees to 8 degrees. Built a 4' taller mast (masthead). Extended the rudder 3". All new interior with structural bulkheads, altered galley, head and forward cabin. Increased tankage. New electronics. Fiberglassed the deck with two layers of 8 oz. glass, one laid diagonally in epoxy coated with Interlux AL-200 followed by Awlgrip. It lasts at least a decade in New England before recoating. Traveler on bridge deck. UGLY but effective. Same could be said for roller furler. Longer mast step, three rung frames, hanging knee, more bolts, tie rod.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

I wished I had removed the cockpit sole when I redid the well, seats and coamings. I would prefer a "dropped" or "hung" cockpit, which, when you open a cockpit seat locker, you're looking at the inside of the hull. This would yield a substantial increase in dry storage capacity.

Absinthe #12

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Five years - December 1999

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

ABSINTHE, Castine, ME

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

A friend's recommendation. I was looking for the right boat for Penobscot Bay. I looked at a couple and then bought ABSINTHE without ever sailing on a Concordia. I am delighted with her.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

Racing in Castine Classic Yacht Race, Eggemoggin Reach Regatta, and other local races in Penobscot Bay.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

A radar system with a screen I can actually see.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Normal maintenance.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

I wouldn't get a cold molded hull.

Lotus #15

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Since 2002

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

LOTUS, Port Townsend, WA

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Memories of growing up in New England; reputation for excellence of construction, performance and elegant handling. Their beauty of line is too obvious to deserve mentioning.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

We raced regularly this year (04) and plan to do much more of it in '05, especially longer distance events if possible. Hopefully Desolation Sound soon and around Vancouver Island.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Light air sails

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

All new running and standing rigging...often using modern blocks and line. Loose footed, fully battened main, Harken traveler and revised mainsheet. Radar, GPS/chart plotter. We made decisions to enhance the boat's performance and handling (particularly for two) while preserving her aesthetics.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

Probably not. We were cautious to take the time before committing to a decision.

Hero #22

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Since August 2003, but we chartered her from July 2002 to July 2003 so we have enjoyed for three seasons so far.

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

HERO, Thimble Islands, Branford, CT

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Classic lines, yawl rig, beautiful joinery details, manageable size, and well thought out design.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

Next summer we plan to cruise to Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard & Buzzards Bay areas.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Roller furling jib, wind instruments, autopilot, lazy jacks, and cockpit deck plate.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Refastened along the rabbit port & starboard, which tightened her up very well Replaced the exhaust stand pipe which eliminated the intermittent exhaust fumes in the cabin Replaced all cushions below

7. Is there anything you would do different?

Find a job that would allow us to spend more time sailing HERO.

Wild Swan #25

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Five years

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

WILD SWAN Southport CT and Stonington CT

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

I had owned a Herreshoff Fish Class sloop (1916) for 15 years and loved it. I wanted to try cruising.

4. What future plans to you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

The boat is in better condition then she was when A & R built her in 1955. (More than I can say for myself). I want the time to use her more and more.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Sails

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

I did the whole 9 yards. Total refit. 60 frames - new deck - everything below the waterline new and much more. I just put in a new alternator and regulator from Jack Raloselet [sp?] - works like a dream.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

I should have sold at the peak of the market in 2000. The above would have been much less painful.

Boats for Sale

#NamePriceSellerContact
51 Vintage $105,000 Larry Bond (360) 385-4000
11 Take Five   Peter Gallant [email protected]
53 Beauty $100,000 Brodie MacGregor [email protected]
66 Misty $125,000 Larsen Marine [email protected]
76 Sumatra $99,500 Peter Crane Yachts [email protected]
14 Saxon $109,500 Robinhood Marine Center [email protected]
35 Memory $35,000 Cannell, Payne & Page [email protected]
64 Live Yankee $75,000 Warren W. Nichols or Charles Gruber [email protected]
52 Banda $112,000 Dodson Boat Yard [email protected]
80 Goldeneye $97,500 Lawrence L. Warner Yacht Brokers [email protected]

Misty

Closing Notes, Last Minute News & Subscription Information

Thank you to all of the owners and Concordia friends that contributed to this issue. And thank you all for your expressions of kindness and compassion following Dave's death. This has been a hard time, but one made easier by our many friends.

I hope you enjoyed the survey, and owners of boats #26-#50 can start working on their answers for the May newsletter.

Deadline for the May newsletter = April 15, 2005

The newsletter continues to be a work in progress so keep the suggestions coming along with the pictures and written contributions. I'm starting to get everyone sorted out, but with 103 boats-some of which have multiple owners and owners with more than one address-it would help me tremendously if you could include your boat # with your correspondence and e-mails. The data base is set up by boat # and it will save me a few seconds here and there scanning up and down the list of owners and boat names.

From this point forward, subscriptions will be $20 per year, which should cover postage and consumables (paper, toner, etc.) Checks should be made payable to Margo Geer (not The Concordian) and mailed to:

249 Argonaut Road
St. Augustine, FL 32086

DON'T FORGET THE 2005 CYC- JULY 10TH through 15TH- CONTACT JAMES RUSSELL @ IYRS-401/848-5777 OR [email protected]

Owner Information Needed!!! I do not have current contact information on the following boats/owners:

"Nothing on Earth is so weak and yielding as water, but for breaking down the firm and strong it has no equal."
Lao-Tsze 550 BC