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The Concordian

Issue #39, Spring 2005

 

Dame of Sark #86

Steve & Nancy Donovan, Cincinnati, OH

Highlights of the year included two races: Newport Bermuda and the Martha's Vineyard "Round The Island" event.

On June 23rd at 11:06:20 PM DAME OF SARK crossed the finish line completing her second Newport Bermuda race. Weary (and smelling a bit ripe) after five days of competition, our crew of six rested as we anchored in the sheltered harbor of St. George's for the night. The next morning we motored the three hour passage to Hamilton, checked in at the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club and learned of our results: 2nd place in cruising class 12; 2nd place in the entire cruising fleet of twenty seven boats; winner, Rod Stevens "Dorade" Trophy for best finish by a vintage yacht.

In addition to these serious accomplishments DAME OF SARK also won what we fondly refer to as the "Goslings Distillery award for Journalistic Excellence". This was a contest for the best e-mail reports sent by a boat during the race. Katie Donovan, age sixteen, entered on our behalf. The race committee published these reports on the official race web site and several of Katie's reports can still be read there. Her final report, mercifully not on the web site, included song lyrics to the theme of "Hello Muddah...Hello Faddah...Camp Granada" To receive our prize-a case of Goslings fine rum-the crew had to sing this song, on stage at one of the awards parties. Most would agree, our crew are better sailors than singers.

All in all the race was a great experience. Sailing conditions were generally good, with two exceptions: a day and one half of frustration with light/no air; and we took a bit of a pounding in the Gulf Stream where a combination of heavy swells and strong wind produced a crack in the DAME'S boom. Using the pipe legs from the table as a splint, we quickly made temporary repairs and continued without further incident. While in Bermuda we were visited by Dan and Cheryl Strohmeier. Dan, as most will recall, won the Bermuda race outright in 1954 sailing Malay #2. Dan came aboard, "inspected" the DAME-giving his approval-- and revealed his secret to winning the race: good boat, good crew and good luck. If only we knew where to shop for some of that "good luck" stuff!

The fifty-five mile Martha's Vineyard "Round The Island" (RTI) race has always been good to Concordias. This year Jeff Makholm with ARAPAHO #85 joined the DAME and the two Concordias took home a respectable collection of silver. We particularly enjoyed partying with Jeff and his crew and look forward to racing with them again next year. We also want to attract more Concordias to this event. The 2005 race will be held on Saturday, July 16. The Edgartown Yacht Club has promised to form a separate Concordia class if we can assemble a five-boat fleet. The Donovans promise to host a party for all Concordians the night before the race.

Carol Lyn #50

Tom & Carol Latta, Rockport, ME

In 1985 our yawl was extensively rebuilt by Paul Rollins of York, Maine, due to severe damage suffered in Hurricane Gloria. Since Rollins does excellent work and because the boat was well maintained in subsequent years, she was in good condition when we purchased her in 2000. Over the five years we have owned "Carol Lyn," we have established a maintenance schedule that both keeps the boat looking handsome and, hopefully, allows us to avoid expensive surprises.

Amongst the work carried out, there have been several successes and at least one notable failure. Successes include having a new jib built that utilizes the jib boom but also can be furled on a roller furler. We also have replaced all of the electronics and stripped and re-varnished the brightwork and made some mechanical improvements.

Stripping the brightwork was a fairly major job since it included removing the port lights and all accessories including the locust cleats and brass rub strips. After using a heat gun, we sanded all surfaces thoroughly and made appropriate repairs. We then used the Epifanes gloss varnish intended for teak. The advantage of this product lies in the fact that multiple coats can be applied without sanding in between coats. To keep things from getting too lumpy, however, we actually ended up sanding every third coat. After ten coats and double coats in each of the succeeding years the brightwork continues to look quite nice. Since the port lights were out anyway, we replaced all of the glass, including that in the skylight and forward hatch with safety glass.

Since the teak seats were very weathered and dried out looking, we had two choices: we could sand, repair and varnish; or we could replace all of the teak. Since "Snow Falcon's" varnished seats have always looked good to us, we chose that option. Although probably not suitable for off shore sailing because they are slippery, varnished seats was the right choice for us. Toward the end of our first season we began to have transmission problems. When the boat was hauled in the fall, we asked Rockport Marine to remove the engine and send the transmission out for rebuilding. Over that winter, while Rockport Marine was cleaning up the engine and replacing all the hoses and other perishable items, we cleaned, scrapped and read leaded the bilge. Those of you who work on your own boats will not be surprised at how many old, rusty tools, fasteners and other trash we found down under the engine area.

It was in the spring, after all of this work was completed, that we discovered that it may have been the original Concordia shift mechanism rather than the transmission that had been causing our problems. Despite lots of adjustments, including a new shift cable, the transmission still would not reliably go into reverse any better than before the rebuild.

Rather than removing the engine and transmission another time, it was decided that we would try a new Morse shifter. Cleaning and painting the bilge and engine were good for the boat. Rebuilding the transmission may have been a waste of money. Once the Morse shifter was installed, finding reverse was no longer a problem.

We affectionately refer to our totally failed project as "Waldo's Revenge." Those of you who have read Waldo Howland's books know that he discouraged customers from altering Ray Hunt's original design. Although we believed Waldo was correct and that most alterations have ultimately turned out to be mistakes, Carol and I wanted a double bunk. Keeping in mind Waldo's dictum, however, I decided not to make any irreversible changes. In addition, since the space in the port side forward storage locker was already occupied by a holding tank, I built a double bunk frame on top of the original locker. We then had a local upholstery company build a mattress to match the new cushions they had made for the main cabin.

To shorten the story, the double bunk was awful. Not only was it too hard and too narrow, it was too thick thereby not providing enough space to turn over. Fortunately, I had left the starboard bunk alone allowing one of us to escape "Waldo's Revenge" for at least a portion of a night's sleep. Before out next cruise the old bunk was re-installed and now our dog, Phoebe, uses our expensive blunder as her mattress.

Plans for this summer include participation in three legs of the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta and cruising for several weeks. Since the Concordia Yawls will be part of a celebration hosted by the Castine Yacht Club and a group of the yawls will be racing toward Castine from the Cape Cod, the turn this year for the race series could exceed even that of last year. Wouldn't it be fun to extend our enjoyment of the boats by cruising together after the race series? How about Northeast Harbor, Somes Sound or even further Down East? Even a trip to Nova Scotia might be fun. Both Carol and I would be pleased to hear the thoughts of other owners in this regard and offer our e-mail address as follows.

It was in the spring, after all of this work was completed that we discovered that it may have been the original Concordia shift mechanism rather than the transmission that had been causing our problems. Despite lots of adjustments, including a new shift cable, the transmission still would not reliably go into reverse any better than before the rebuild. Rather than removing the engine and transmission another time, it was decided that we would try a new Morse shifter. Cleaning and painting the bilge were good for the boat. Rebuilding the transmission may have been a waste of money. Once the Morse shifter was installed, finding reverse was no longer a problem.

We affectionately refer to our totally failed project as "Waldo's Revenge." Those of you who have read Waldo Howland's books know that he discouraged customers from altering Ray Hunt's original design. Although we believed Waldo was correct and that most alterations have ultimately turned out to be mistakes, Carol and I wanted a double bunk. Keeping in mind Waldo's dictum, however, I decided not to make any irreversible changes. In addition, since the space in the port side forward storage locker was already occupied by a holding tank, I built a double bunk frame on top of the original locker. We then had a local upholstery company build a mattress to match the new cushions they had made for the main cabin.

To shorten the story, the double bunk was awful. Not only was it too hard and too narrow, it was too think thereby not providing enough space to turn over. Fortunately, I had left the starboard bunk alone allowing one of us to escape "Waldo's Revenge" for at least a portion of a night's sleep. Before our next cruise the old bunk was re-installed and now our dog, Phoebe, uses our expensive blunder as her mattress.

Plans for this summer include participation in three legs of the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta and cruising for several weeks. Since Concordia Yawls will be part of a celebration hosed by the Castine Yacht Club and a group of yawls will be racing toward Castine from Cape Cod, the turnout for the race series could exceed even that of last year. Wouldn't it be fun to extend our enjoyment of the boats by cruising together after the race series? How about Northeast Harbor, Somes Sound, or even further Down East? Even a trip to Nova Scotia might be fun. Both Carol and I would be pleased to hear the thought of other owners in this regard. Please e-mail us at: [email protected]

Crocodile #67

Edgar Crocker, Manchester, MA

My father, U. Haskell Crocker, bought Crocodile in 1959 and she has been based in Manchester, Massachusetts ever since. We have cruised from Newport to Nova Scotia and raced extensively in 15 Jeffries Ledge races, 25 Patton Bowl, 8 Halifax races and winning in 1997. Enclosed is a picture of Malay and Crocodile at Roque Island - a couple of tired old Halifax Race winners. I own 2 houses and a mooring in Keiths Cove Kennebacasis Island on the St John River, New Brunswick. Please stop by and call me at 617-899-6818 as Concordias are always welcome. We have been on the river for 20 years and would love to help you plan your trip to St. John.

Crocodile sleeps at Crockers Boat Yard in Manchester, MA. They have done a magnificent job on maintaining her in Bristol Fashion. Last year they replaced all the sisters and this year polished the bottom as Crocodile wants to enter this year's Halifax race. We plan to leave Halifax on the 15th and spend 10 days going to St. John. On the way we will stop at Lunenberg NS and visit the home of the Picton-Castle.com who grows entrepreneurs with an urge to own a Concordia. If you are there, please mention my name as we are associated with the ship. They can fix anything and the latch key is always open at the Grand Banker. I am involved in Worldwiseed.com and we are looking for individuals, trade associates and companies who are interested in promoting Dyslexic Education sustainable development.

Lotus #15 and Sumatra #76

Chris & Kathy Grace, Port Townsend, WA

Things have gone well for us and our relationship with Lotus over the last three years. It was a bit intimidating at first, learning the boat, getting a handle on the maintenance, the inevitable changes and upgrades. The money, the time. Now, looking back, it seems like an obvious decision. Last Friday in our second race of the season on a brilliant cool evening, and we were able to stay in the front much of the time , finally finishing third, it seemed the best was yet to come. The new asymmetrical definitely gets the job done. The mizzen stays'l thrown in for dramatic effect.

What I am avoiding admitting is that we bought Sumatra #76 from the MacDougals of Santa Barbara. Look, there is no way to justify this. Yes, I have a rationalization or two...even a good story...it seems to be more credible with a little Scotch.

They do look good together, tied neatly to a shared finger pier. Their transoms reflected in the water side by side like multiple mirror images. I tell everyone that it is only temporary , but there is no need to rush things. Kathy is threatening to hand pick her own crew to race...there's no loyalty.

We bought the boat in February, after hearing there might be an opportunity to talk Stewart out of his third Concordia. Sumatra did her level best to maintain her dignity in the crowded Santa Barbara harbor. A bit sun baked and out of place amidst the fiberglass and carbon fiber. We made a list of what we thought she needed, discussed it rationally and on the flight home ignored all the careful analysis and wrote a check.

A couple of weeks later we flew back with duffels crammed with packing material and tools. Sumatra was hauled and for two days we worked to pull her rig and ready her for shipment north. It was a great few days with a lot of good food and drink just to keep our crew happy.

We're not sure what's next. We have refinished the spars, made new spreaders and standing rigging and are in the process of replacing the engine controls. The masts will be stepped next week. I am considering quitting my day job. We welcome suggestions or perhaps an intervention.

Abaco #102

Jonathan & Dorothy Goldweitz, Stamford, CT

When we sent a report to The Concordian in late October last fall, there was no unusual winter maintenance planned for Abaco, so we reported that we just would strip and refinish the next area of brightwork needing attention. That plan changed the evening we planned to sail from Stamford to the Connecticut River.

Our Graymarine 4-112 engine failed to start, and after spending the next day troubleshooting we found water in one of the cylinders and severe corrosion from the years of raw water cooling. As we had plenty of wind but no guarantee of quickly repairing the engine, Dorothy and I left at sunset for an exhilarating beat down Long Island Sound in 20 knots of northeast breeze to Saybrook Breakwater where we arrived before dawn. We had arranged a tow up the Connecticut River and into the Cove Landing Marine pier in Hamburg Cove, where John and Rachel appeared and helped us raft to Hero. Now we had all winter to fix things.

Well, it has been a long winter! After pulling out the engine we found some bad wood at the ends of the two sets of frames just forward of the stuffing box. These were expertly repaired by CLM with sections of newly laminated oak frame scarfed in to replace the originals. The yard also replaced one plank at the starboard cockpit thru hull and are replacing the original thru hulls with proper shut-off valves. While the engine was out and we could access beneath the entire cockpit, Dorothy and I refastened delaminated frames, revarnished aft and outboard of the bilge and refinished and applied fresh red lead paint to the entire bilge area. We also removed the companionway sliding hatch to repair loose fastenings in one of the tracks. This lead to wooding and refinishing the brightwork on the cabin top (under the tracks) and refinishing the underside of the hatch as well.

We are finally at the point of reassembling things, and a new prop shaft, cutlass bearing, stuffing box and engine coupling have been installed. After we replace hoses for the manual and electric bilge pumps (and install the manual pump strainer beneath the engine so it can be easily removed for cleaning), we will finish topside and bottom painting and, finally, launch. Next will come new batteries (AGM replacing gel) and the new engine. In our attempt to keep Abaco as traditional a Concordia 39 yawl as possible, we had replaced the original engine with an exact replica 15 years ago. This time, we are doing the same, but with the addition of a heat exchanger to give us fresh water cooling and, hopefully, longer engine life.

Sailing plans this summer include a Maine cruise in late July and early August. Work commitments prevent our joining the IYRS Classic Cruise for the first time since it began, and we will miss seeing our many friends. Hopefully we will cross tacks with other Concordias between Long Island Sound and down east Maine over the summer.

Concordia Company

South Dartmouth, MA

Happy Spring from Concordia!
After a seemingly long and snowy winter, spring has been reasonably good and we have a good jump on our commissioning commitments. Our winter Concordia carpentry projects have gone according to plan and, other than NIAM, are complete. NIAM is in the process of having her new keel timber installed, to go along with 78 new frames, 25 new floors, 18 new planks and new sternpost (see photos). In addition we are installing an extended mast step with tie-rod system, a new Yanmar 3JH-3, and new electrical and electronic systems. Anticipated completion is August, which will allow time for some sailing and tweaking any details resulting from the rebuild.

We congratulate the Ryan family for 50 years of ownership and for putting the boat in great shape for next fifty.

BEAUTY (#53) has been sold to Charles Ansbacher of Cambridge, MA. She is renamed DOLCE and we are delighted that she will be staying here in Padanaram. Scheduled launch is April 25th.

Cape to Castine Race:

Last year David Bicks of Castine Yacht Club, in association with Sparkman & Stephens 75th Anniversary celebration, organized a passage race from the East end of the Cape Cod Canal to Castine, ME. This 175 mile overnight race, primarily for classic boats, was well supported and was a great way for boats to get downeast to Penobscot Bay in time for celebrations at Castine, the Castine - Camden feeder race, the Camden to Brooklin feeder race and winding up at the Eggemoggin Reach Regatta in Brooklin.

This year David Bicks suggested that it might be a good idea to honor the Concordia Yawls and have as many yawls as possible participate in the Cape to Castine Race. Concordia Company has agreed to promote the event to the Concordia Class and to organize events surrounding the start. At present we have three firm entries, with approximately 8 "likely" entries in addition.

The date is Sunday, July 31, 2005 and Concordia Company will plan some sort of appropriate celebration in Padanaram on Saturday, July 30. The idea is that the fleet will proceed on the Sunday morning through the canal at slack tide (which is approximately at noon) in time to start a race at approximately 2:30 pm. Obviously, we would like to have a good showing of Concordias, especially since the Castine Yacht Club has seen fit to honor us.

Please check your calendars and plan to come join the fun if at all possible.
Contact Brodie MacGregor at 508-999-1381 or [email protected] for details.

6th IYRS Classic Yacht Cruise

supported by Louis Vuitton

July 9, Saturday Evening party on ARABELLA in Newport
Supported by The Hinckley Company
(ARABELLA leaves Newport Sunday morning).
July 10, Sunday The Official Cruise Kick-Off Party:
CYC fleet converges on Nantucket
Moor/raft up in Nantucket
Champagne reception and hors d'oeuvre contest
Supported by F.L. Woods & Sparkman & Stephens
July 11, Monday Race to Vineyard Haven
Tour of Gannon & Benjamin Yard by Nat Benjamin
Dinner at Tisbury Wharf supported by Pussers Rum
Presentation on the NY30 Class by Bill Doyle
July 12, Tuesday Cruise in Company to Padanaram
Tour of the Concordia Yard
Tour of the New Bedford Whaling Museum with Llewellyn Howland, III
Dinner at New Bedford Yacht Club
With a presentation by Alan Granby
Supported by Duffy, Sweeney & Scott
July 13 - Wednesday Cruise to Third Beach
Raft and Relax at Third Beach, Middletown
BBQ on the beach
July 14 - Thursday Cruise in Company to IYRS
End of Cruise Garden Party
Supported by Charlie and Phoebe Milligan
July 15 - Friday President's Breakfast at IYRS
IYRS Summer Gala: dinner, auction and dance
Supported by Louis Vuitton

For more information call James Russell, VP Development, (401) 855-0729;
Email: [email protected];
fax: (401) 842-0669
or mail to: IYRS Classic Yacht Cruise, 449 Thames Street, Newport, RI 02840, USA.

Mary Ann #26

Bob & Linda Jones, Boothbay, ME

Sistering Mary Ann, 2004-2005
Doug Goldhirsch
Southport Island Marine

As Mary Ann, Concordia yawl #26, owned by Bob and Linda Jones on Boothbay, Maine reached 50, it became evident that some significant structural work would be advisable. A sort of "harmonic convergence" of events lead to the planning of this work.

After hauling Mary Ann following the 2004 sailing season, Bob Jones came to us (Southport Island Marine, LLC, Southport, ME) wanting the old Gray Marine engine in Mary Ann to be cleaned up and detailed. We decided early on that the best way to accomplish this was to remove the engine from the boat, put it on a bench where it could be properly cleaned, refinished, rebuilt, and tested.

Soon after making this decision, Bob came in and showed us a letter from his insurance company stating that Mary Ann could not be insured until a few cracked frames noted in an earlier survey were repaired. These frames were located under the cockpit.

It didn't take long for us to realize that the fortuitous removal of the engine gave us access to the areas in need of repair, which would not have been possible with the engine in place.

Once the engine was removed, we were able to temporarily remove most of the vertical oak cockpit supports. This made it easier, indeed possible, for our shipwright to get into this still small space to work. With the engine out of the way, a thorough examination revealed 16 frames needing attention.

Mary Ann, like many (all?) Concordia Yawls, has many sister frames throughout the boat, but not in the area where we were working (under the cockpit). So our decision, in consultation with the owner and surveyor, was to install sister frames in way of the cracks. Each sister would extend two planks past the crack. We used 1/8 inch laminations of white oak glued together with West System Brand Epoxy. Our Shipwright, Doug Fowle, used the following method to get the job done:

This was somewhat of a time consuming process due in most part to the nature of the work space, but in the end we got neat, clean, well laid out and well executed repairs. The surveyor was impressed, the owner was happy, and we were proud of the job we had done.

There were a few special problems that we addressed along the way:

Several frames in the boat that were originally installed with kerfs sawn in them to facilitate the bending, had bronze straps over them to hold the sawn and glued (we think) frames in place. One of these on the starboard side under the engine needed to be repaired and have it's bronze strap renewed.

The frame under the engine shift lever had some significant rot. This was due to water dripping onto it from the shift lever itself, a beautiful original shift arrangement (presumably) of bronze rod and linkages. It seems that there is a stuffing box to prevent this dripping, but the packing had not been renewed in many years - we remedied this problem.

The above mentioned frame could not just be sistered, as there was some rot, and the shift mechanism landed on it. So it needed to be rebuilt. Doug sawed out a section of this frame in such a way that he could scarf in a new piece. This was no small task in the confines of the small space under the cockpit. He then thru-bolted a 1/8 inch bronze strap on the forward face of this frame as insurance that the scarf joints would hold up.

As a matter of course, while the engine was out of the boat, we pulled the propeller, shaft, and cutlass bearings for inspection and repair. We also took the opportunity to clean up the engine drip pan, replace the rubber exhaust hoses, and to check all other fittings that will be impossible to get to once the engine goes back in.

After these mid-century improvements we all feel good about shepherding Mary Ann through another 50 years of inspirational sailing.

Sarah #27

Margo Geer, St. Augustine, FL

I generally start writing my newsletter piece by re-reading what I wrote in the previous edition, but I know that was a sad piece about Dave's death, and so very much has happened since.

The move to the warehouse was accomplished on January 12th, and Sarah seems happy in her new 50' x 60' home. James, who had originally planned to go cruising after the first of the year, has agreed to stay on through October, and I believe all of the major work can be accomplished in that time frame. As of Thursday, May 19th, James had completed repairs to two floors high up in the stern that may have been damaged during the move or with the boat settling. He also finished the last new port frame that date. We have some repairs to the laminated floating frames to do, but all work needed on the floors and full-length frames has been completed. Two floors repaired, 38 floors replaced, and 80 new frames plus the move, new deadwood, new stern knee, and various and sundry support projects completed since last October.

Recent heroes include Jeff Makholm, who came down shortly after the move to the warehouse and helped me move all 10 million loose pieces from my garage to the warehouse, and Paul Haley, who spent parts of two days educating me and James on intricate Concordia details and helping us chart out a course for the items to be completed, repaired, and/or replaced. For anyone who hasn't had a Capt. Haley survey, there aren't enough words in my vocabulary to express my distaste at the dreaded yellow crayon (used to mark items that need repair). Even after he left, James or I would come across a previously unnoticed yellow mark, and utter a string of invectives. Yellow mark = more work...

On the humorous side, Capt. Haley got drafted into service when he underestimated James' quick response to his suggestion that we remove the cockpit floor to facilitate repairs. Essentially within a few hours of the initial discussion on whether or not to remove the cockpit floor, James assessed the situation, figured there wasn't much to loose, broke out the Sawsall, and what didn't cut, came loose with a few swings of increasingly larger hammers. I've learned that the only way to keep anything precious intact is to get ahead of James and just keep running, so I dove below the cockpit and removed the cabinet-grade support posts Dave made shortly before his death. The others responded well to the previously mentioned "hammer theory."

There are pictures of the transport to the warehouse and the cockpit removal in my albums at www.imagestation.com - If you haven't already, you have to set up a user account and then click on photo sharing. Enter user name "margogeer" - all lower case - no quotation marks, and that should take you to a list of my albums.

I haven't had time to get the website updated (still), especially now as I find myself working 40-50 hour weeks to support the project, but SARAH is safe and dry, and slowly coming back together. That is what matters.

Survey Results

Mary Ann #26

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Over 20 years

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

MARYANN, Townsend Gut Boothbay Harbor, Maine

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Our neighbor, Dr. Clarke Staples owned "OFFCALL" and infected us!

4. What future plans do you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

She is 50 now and we are 67. We plan to hang out together, take care of one another and hopefully infect others.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Sails one day soon.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

She is surveyed every 3 - 5 years and updated, as in report to you this month. Extended Mast Step, propane stove.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

Owned her when we were younger!

Safari #28

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

20 Years

2. Vessel Name and hailing port?

SAFARI, Gloucester, MA

4. What future plans do you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

Finish up rebuilding bottom/backbone. Get her out of my shed where it's been for the past 5 years. CRUISE!

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Rebuild Greymarine and keep. (No diesel) Build new set of cockpit seat backs.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Tiller type auto pilot. Can't live without.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

Sell everything - Fix Boat - Live!!!!

Harrier #30

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

49 years come September 2005.

2. Vessel Name and Hailing port?

Harrier, Jamestown, RI

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

In 1955 I sailed Harrier with Ray Hunt in England. She won 6 of 6 races in Cows week. Her beauty and performance were enough to make up my mind she was for me if Ray would ever part with her.

4. What future plans do you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

No serious plans. Maybe IYRS Classic Cruise and CCA Summer Cruise in our home water.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New Sails? Etc.

After 48 years, I think we have about everything we really want or need.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

We traded forward pipe berths for a big double and a new single bunk, put in hot and cold pressure water, new teak deck, a 2 piece vacuum sealed job, really great. 10 new planks below waterline, 3400 new fasteners and thru-bolted all floors. New engine bed, jib furler, auto helm and cabin heater. New YarMar, lost original mast in '58, replaced with aluminum, replaced with wood in 1995, much better. We have radar now. All of these improvements took place over 10 years or so. 10 BDA Races, 3 Marion BDA Races and 4 or 5 Annapolis races, plus every weekend racing in our early years took their toll, but now, no leaks anywhere and sound as new.

Owl #31

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Since 1996, with 11,000 miles in the log thus far.

2. Vessel Name and Hailing Port?

OWL, Manchester, Massachusetts

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Our desire for a classic boat that would be swift yet seakindly, ideal for extended cruising and easily single-handed. We were very fortunate to find #31 for sale just as she had come to the end of a masterful restoration (structural and cosmetic) by Peter Costa and his colleagues at Triad Boatworks. Their work included all backbone items, mast step tie rod system, repowering and superb carpentry and finishing.

4. What future plans do you have?

Cruising in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Surpassing our 2004 record of 74 days on board. More offshore passages, which are always among the most vivid experience of any year.

5. What items do you have on your wish list?

The 35- pound CQR feels a bit heavier each year, and I think a windlass will probably be added in the next decade. Other desires include more books for the ever-growing ship's library.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made?

New GPS and flat panel radar, which swing out into the companionway from each side; the 18" radar dome is Awlgripped to match the spar color. Lightening protection, engine gauge panel, second house battery, Balmar high output alternator and step regulator. New running rigging. Extensive sternpost repair. All new cushions, new head, galley rebuilt in locust, Broadwater CNG stove. Interior paint redone in recent winters. Owl is very capably maintained by the expert staff of Manchester Marine, with much owner work also.

7. Is there anything you would do differently?

If we could only have bought this boat ten years sooner! It has enriched our lives in countless ways, above all through new friendships made on the water.

Yankee #37

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

Five years.

2. Vessel name and hailing port.

YANKEE, Henderson Harbor, NY

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

Concordia's celebrated lines, performance and comfort all attracted me to this classic yawl. Yankee has surpassed my expectations. I take great personal pride and pleasure in owning her.

4. What future plans do you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

We plan extensive cruising on Lake Ontario this season. Spring '05 finds us planning varnish details, with no repairs needed. We'll also add a light coat of white Toplac to topsides & do the annual bottom anti-foulant. We'll be flying a new Hood club jib, too.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Perhaps refrigeration at a later date, after lots of mulling over and study.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Since 2000 improvements include, Paneltronics main electrical panel and re-wiring; Raymarine auto helm; Replacement of galley countertop with African Mahogany; Broadwater stainless steel galley stove and broiler, (propane fueled); New stereo/CD player in main saloon; Rebuilt bridge deck with teak planking; Refinished head compartment with 15-gallon holding tank and deck pump-out fitting; Lazy jacks on main mast/boom; Replaced Westerbeke 108 diesel's injectors, water pump and voltage regulator.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

No. Enjoyed all tasks-so far. Results proved successful.

Raka #43

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

22 years.

2. Vessel name and hailing port?

RAKA, Boston but now Boothbay Harbor, Maine, permanently.

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

I was looking for a classic wooden yacht, but smaller. A boat builder friend, Dave Nutt, recommended that I purchase RAKA. In tough shape at the time, but restorable. Classic lines, beautiful workmanship, excellent sailing qualities.

4. What future plans do you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

At 72 I'm slowing down. Usually do the ERR, lots of day sailing/cruising on the coast of Maine.

5. What items do you have on your wish list? Refrigeration? Windless? New sails? Etc.

Maybe a windless. More importantly 1) Deck recovering - I still have the original canvas. 2) Strip and re-do the bright work.

6. What repairs/modifications have you made and how have they benefited the vessel's upkeep, performance, or comfort?

Almost too numerous to mention. Original repairs in 1984 and 1985 - New engine and fuel tank, replaced 12 +/- planks, extended and refinished mast and boom, complete re-finish of hull and brightwork. Installed instruments.

Later repairs/upgrades - (Beyond periodic refinishing)
Replaced another 10 - 12 planks, replaced keel bolts, installed SS support system under mast. New 2 speed self-tailing winches. New instruments S/H speed. depth, wind Raytheon Radar/GPS, dual bilge pump, three bank batteries with combiner, replaced teak cockpit seats, new canvas and sails. Re glued mast after partial failure.

7. Is there anything you would do different?

Buy a boat in excellent condition rather than one that needs restoration. After spending comparable dollars, and lots of personal effort, I have a boat which still does not compare. Install most of the noted upgrades earlier. They have greatly improved the quality of our sailing comfort.

Moonfleet #49

1. How long have you owned your Concordia?

2 years

2. Vessel name and hailing port?

MOONFLEET, Mallet's Bay, Vermont

3. What drew you to your Concordia?

My family has owned Katrina # 94 since 1963. It's in my blood.

4. What future plans do you have? Cruises, races planned? Repairs? Modifications? Etc.

I had a centerline rebuild done at Rockport Marine in the winter of 2003-2004. She is in Bristol condition. New deck (dynel), toe rails, interior refinished, etc. Can't think of anything she needs.

Notes from your errant editor...

...Well, I'm zero and three for getting the newsletter out by my self-imposed deadline. This issue's excuses include the fact that sailing opportunities have abounded. Toward the end of March I had the opportunity to crew on an offshore race from St. Augustine to St. Marys, Georgia (three days counting the trip back), followed in short order by the opportunity to fly to Mexico and bring a boat back to St. Augustine. Figuring that no one in this crowd would begrudge me sailing time, I accepted both offers and between sailing and paying the price when I returned to the office, I'm afraid the newsletter ended up put off for too long.

...Congratulations to Charles Ansbacher on his purchase of Beauty, which as been rechristened Dolce. Thanks to David Catlett, #7, for letting me copy his collection of The Concordian. Doug Cole sent me copies of the first issues, so I have many of the older newsletters and an updated ad for the Concordia Boat Company. If anyone would like a copy of the advertisement for their scrapbook, just let me know.

...It's probably been installed for a month now, but Jim Brown (Sonnet #63) was looking for input regarding installation of an autopilot. Anyone with experience to share can contact him at [email protected]

...The third of the Waldo Howland series is in print. - For information on Integrity A Life In Boats, you may contact Howland and Company; [email protected] I also notice it listed in the new catalog from WoodenBoat. www.woodenboat.com

...Tony Harwell, (Actaea #17) has a good source for SB screws and several hundred #14 x2s are involved in Sarah's new bottom. Tony can be reached at [email protected]

...It would be helpful to me when sending correspondence, subscription checks, or e-mails if you would include your boat number. There are 103 boats. Some have multiple owners. Some owners have multiple addresses (winter and summer). Some boats have hailing ports that vary from mailing addresses. It occasionally gets confusing...

...If you sent something and it didn't get included in the newsletter, PLEASE bring it to my attention. I would never intentionally omit an item, but again in the vast amount of mail and e-mail, it is very easy to miss an incoming item.

...Also, if you are getting duplicate copies or if there is a "preferred" mailing address, please let me know. Subscriptions are $20.00 per year and that pretty much covers the postage and consumables (paper, toner, etc.)

I am missing current owner information for:

...The surveys seem to be going over well, and many of the owners in the #26-50 group sent in their responses before I got the surveys out in the mail. Owners of #'s 51-75 get your answers ready!

...I'm coming up for the CYC in July and would love to catch a ride on any (or all) of the five Concordias registered. Keep in mind that if you invite me aboard, you're not in for much sailing help. I can generally occasionally figure out the difference in port and starboard, but that's about it. I will also be back up for the Wooden Boat Show in Newport, August 26-28. The phone # listed on the back is my cell phone. If any of you plan to attend the WBS, please give me a call. If they have a WoodenBoat Forum booth this year, I'll probably be close to it or someone there will know where I am.

...Thanks again to all of the Concordia community for the friendship, encouragement, and tremendous support ... M

The Concordia fleet extends condolences to Ann Ashton, Phalarope #13, on the loss of her husband, Tom. The story of #13's "sail of a lifetime" was on the cover of the last issue of The Concordian, and I was saddened to hear of Tom's passing. A note from Ann included the fact that Tom so enjoyed last summer's sailing and that Phalarope was receiving fine care in their son's capable hands.

Crossing The Bar
Sunset and evening star,
And one clear call for me!
And may there be no moaning of the bar,
When I put out to sea,

But such a tide as moving seems asleep,
Too full for sound and foam.
When that which drew from out of the boundless deep
Turns again for home.

Twilight and evening bell,
And after that the dark!
And may there be no sadness of farewell,
When I embark;

For though from out our bourne of Time and Place
The flood may bear me far,
I hope to see my Pilot face to face
When I have crossed the bar.

Alfred, Lord Tennyson
1889